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Friday, April 25, 2014

Thoughts while doing a research project

If there is something to be careful about when handling a research project, it is to be wary of assumptions. I have found that during the course of my project, whereby I am studying why students procrastinate on writing assignments, there are many different factors and opinions that come into play. While unifying these different factors and looking for commonalities, I feel like even with all the background literature I have read, a lot of the conclusions and inferences I have been drawing, may be considered subjective in some light. I fear that if someone with a completely different mindset were to be exposed to all the literature I have been exposed to, and all the gathered raw data I have gathered, they might come to a different conclusion than I for the same question I am asking. I am trying to be extremely careful as to include all possibilities in my conclusions and to gear towards what is most likely, but there is just this overhanging fear that unless I actually test my data and proposed conclusions, I will not ever be perfectly content that I have truly identified as to why students procrastinate in their writing assignments.

            But all in all, I guess that is the nature of research: to bring forth a baby step to the solution, in hopes one day the solution is reached. Maybe my project is just a small step towards continuing projects that’s should be conducted to truly see how to halt the trend of procrastination. It is truly an endeavor to begin a research project on anything, because if you do not commit to furthering the next project your original project has brought on, you are haunted by the questions you do not know the answers to.

2 comments:

  1. I appreciate you sharing your writing with all of us. You make some interesting statements here. I'm interested as to what effects you think socio-economic class might play in the procrastination practiced by students you encounter. In my personal experiences I've found that many people who are considered to be middle-class, procrastinate because they know they are able to afford it. While students who are lower/working class citizens procrastinate as well, but for different reasons. Either they see no point in trying or don't think they'd be able to complete the task at hand--even though that can't necessarily afford to procrastinate. Yes, researching can be like taking baby step, but baby steps are necessary before we learn to run. Again, I appreciate your post and hope to hear from you again. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I appreciate you sharing your writing with all of us. You make some interesting statements here. I'm interested as to what effects you think socio-economic class might play in the procrastination practiced by students you encounter. In my personal experiences I've found that many people who are considered to be middle-class, procrastinate because they know they are able to afford it. While students who are lower/working class citizens procrastinate as well, but for different reasons. Either they see no point in trying or don't think they'd be able to complete the task at hand--even though that can't necessarily afford to procrastinate. Yes, researching can be like taking baby step, but baby steps are necessary before we learn to run. Again, I appreciate your post and hope to hear from you again. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete