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Showing posts from August, 2013

Guidance

My Professor asked the question, "What role does the tutor play in helping the student learn about her writing?" One role is to act as a guide, the definition of which is (according to Webster’s Dictionary) is “one that leads or directs another’s way; a person who explains points of interest.” As a verb it means “to give advice and instruction to (someone) regarding the course or process to be followed.” I like those definitions. A tutor suggests courses of action to follow and lets the writer make the choice. We can do that by asking them what they think they should do instead of giving them the answers to their questions every time, let them hold something to write with so they can make notes about their thoughts, point out what they’re doing right, give honest advice, ask clarifying or probing questions to get them to think about their writing. Those are some suggestions. I’m sure there are more. The idea is that guidance gives the writer enough room to think for himself …

Considering the role of a tutor ( Or the many)?

The tutor’s role can be viewed differently from both the student and the tutor him/herself. From the student’s perspective they sometimes see them as an authority figure, someone that makes the rules and can pre-grade their paper. The tutor is far from it. When it comes to authority the student is in charge since it is their piece, the tutor is a guide or even assistant. Advice is given on thoughts, vocabulary, flow, and more to the student and that advice can be followed or disregarded freely. The tutor walks the student through the writing process and helps translate what they want to say versus what is currently being said or understood. Tutors are guides to a clearer, fuller, and or more interesting piece but a guide does not carry the student, we follow them and assist on the way.
Conflictions, questions, and even blocks can prevent a student from accomplishing a great paper. The tutor’s role tends to skew from a simple guide to a teacher or coach. Information is delivered in a r…

Considering the Role of a Tutor

It is my understanding, after reading the first 3 chapters of "The Longman Guide to Peer Tutoring" by Paula Gillespie and Neal Lerner as well as observing and reflecting on two peer tutoring sessions, that a tutor's role is to facilitate discovery and ownership with the student being tutored. With Composition being a seemingly very complex process, I will illustrate by another example. When you are tutoring someone in U.S. Economic History because a test is coming up, you don't simply fill out their test review sheet and then leave. I suppose you could actually do that, and then they would look over it and hopefully retain enough to pass the exam. If you teach them the concepts, vocabulary, and even methods of effective study though, they will be better prepared to study for future exams themselves and battle the experience of higher education , not just pass the exam they have next week.
     As I understand it, tutoring in writing is similar to this, only more …

Roles of a Tutor

Tutors can play various roles when helping students learn about their writing. A tutor is obviously a form of teacher, but it is also very important to play the role of a trustworthy peer, equal, and even friend. Seeking help from tutors can be an intimidating task for students, though when paired with a compatible tutor, the student will find their time and courage well spent. All too often tutors come off as impatient and condescending, which may actually be true in some situations. The most important skill one may find as a tutor is viewing the student as an equal. Many times students are discouraged enough as it is, and they do not need further scrutiny from a tutor to further barrage their self esteem.
As a tutor, it is very important to focus on the positive attributes of a student’s writing. When making suggestions or corrections, it may be wise to sandwich them between two or more positive and uplifting comments on the student’s work. Also, be flexible. Keep in mind that the w…